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Washington DC begins to swarm its darkest streets with civic art. Sound familiar?

Washington DC begins to swarm its darkest streets with civic art. Sound familiar?
On the back end of Washington DC’s Union Station, numerous passenger railways stretch to the northeast across several city blocks, by means of a lengthy, viaduct-like structure. By and large, this viaduct separates the gentrifying Near Northeast neighborhood, consisting primarily of two- and three-story rowhomes set back from the street, and the gentrifying NoMa neighborhood (“North of Massachusetts”) which is redeveloping into an array of fashionable office and apartment high-rises (probably mid-rises by most other cities’ standards), along with retail on the lower level.   Perpendicular...
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INDOT Proposes a Devastating Blow to Downtown Neighborhoods (Edited)

INDOT Proposes a Devastating Blow to Downtown Neighborhoods (Edited)
One very powerful state organization has a proposal to set back the past 40 years of downtown redevelopment. Instead of a bold proposal that would help reunite the urban fabric, INDOT gives us the stuff of nightmares: INDOT gave us what the roadway could look like, but they didn’t give us the street-level view. Fortunately, local architects decided to fill in that massive gap. The highway exists in the top photo, but at least it can be partially mitigated with greenery. Not so with a giant concrete wall. Click the above pdf to see the whole impact analysis for yourself. It’s worth a look....
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IndyGo Route Improvements Set for February

IndyGo Route Improvements Set for February
IndyGo has announced additional trips along some key routes for February of this year. This has likely occurred in part because of the new income tax, which was able to start being collected in October of 2017. This announcement serves as a reminder that these system changes were not all about the Red Line. These new improvements happen to occur in some of the most transit-dependent areas in the...
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New Proposal for Fountain Square

New Proposal for Fountain Square
Another day, another Milhaus proposal. This is proposed to be located in Fountain Square, just east of Shelby on Prospect Street. The adjacent vacant lot to the east is the proposed new location of IFD Station 3. Thoughts? Elevations Perspectives Materials Site...
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CityWay Phase Two Breaking Ground: the Pros and the Cons

CityWay Phase Two Breaking Ground: the Pros and the Cons
Earlier this year (it’s still 2017!), Buckingham Companies broke ground on the next phase of CityWay, an expansive development south of the train trestle on land formerly belonging to Eli Lilly and Company. The first phase (completed in 2012) features over 250 apartments, parking garages fully hidden from the primary streets, the Alexander Hotel, over 40,000 square feet for retail, and a partnership with the YMCA for a voluminous fitness center across from the Alexander—all on the south side of the tracks, primarily fronting Delaware and South streets.   This next phase has morphed...
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New Proposed 2-Story Commercial Building in Meridian Kessler

New Proposed 2-Story Commercial Building in Meridian Kessler
Last year, the former dry cleaners at the southwest corner of 49th and College was demolished. Dry cleaners are notorious in their potential to be future brownfields, and that is certainly the case with the former one-story structure that used to be there: Unfortunately, that brownfield can extend past the source of the pollution. The duplex to the south is now less safe to occupy with residents. A development group has bought the 2 properties in question, with the intent to clean up the contaminated soil, and to build a new structure. This structure will house a potential restaurant, with an upstairs...
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Connecting People to Parks: Grassy Creek Trail

Connecting People to Parks: Grassy Creek Trail
One of the larger issues that suburban Indianapolis faces is lack of connectivity, especially for anyone not in a vehicle. One of the more interesting new efforts to change this is the recent addition of Grassy Creek Trail. It doesn’t look like much from the large scale view: A zoom in to the northern trail head shows something rather unique, at least for a suburban trail: there is only a one-car parking lot: There are likely close to 500 people living in the subdivision and apartment complex to the north here. And the one thing that this style of development has in spades is a lot of on-street...
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Bus Rapid Transit Could be a Game Changer for Indy Neighborhoods

Bus Rapid Transit Could be a Game Changer for Indy Neighborhoods
Indianapolis has largely succeeded in transforming its downtown from a sleepy no-man’s land to a place where people want to be. It’s not perfect, but it’s a downtown that can stand up among its peers. Throughout all of this focus on downtown, Indy’s neighborhoods have largely maintained a similar trajectory with regards to their built form for the past century. Broad Ripple and Fountain Square have probably seen the most new development, but almost every new structure has had to include a nod to off street auto parking. This raises the cost for development, increasing the...
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Indianapolis is Losing its Bicycling Mojo-Guest Post by Austin Gibble

Indianapolis is Losing its Bicycling Mojo-Guest Post by Austin Gibble
Austin Gibble is a frequent commenter and Urban Indy fan, and has been gracious enough to share this blog post with us: Indianapolis is Losing Its Bicycling Mojo The United States Census Bureau released 2016 Journey to Work data this past week, and it does not paint a pretty picture for bicycling in Indianapolis. In fact, many cities that are notoriously bike-friendly, lost some riders. This includes Portland, OR and Minneapolis, MN. However, this isn’t necessarily true across the board. The average change for bike commuting throughout the United States is a decline of 0.4%, likely attributed to low...
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Separated Bike Paths: Safer, More Useful, and Possibly Less Controversial

Separated Bike Paths: Safer, More Useful, and Possibly Less Controversial
Few subjects draw the ire of neighborhood residents like bike lanes. Our posts on the Broad Ripple bike lanes featured comment threads that got almost out of control. And to this day, I still think in general these lanes are a positive change, as vehicles drive slower through the section now, and the road feels safer to the user (including pedestrians and drivers, as well as cyclists). The lanes are basically a simple coat of white paint. The pavement that was a 40-mile an hour 4 lane road is slightly less of a stroad now. I haven’t talked much about bike lanes since the Broad Ripple Avenue ones...
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