web analytics

Pandemic Parking: Reclaiming the Streets for Embattled Restaurants, Through the Parklets of Al Fresco Dining

Pandemic Parking: Reclaiming the Streets for Embattled Restaurants, Through the Parklets of Al Fresco Dining
I’m revisiting this site after a long, long hiatus, not because I’m back in Indy or because I have an update on development and planning.  These days, I barely make it back more than a few days each year.  And this article will not feature Indy-based photos.  But, after all those disclaimers, let me make my case: I still diligently follow the goings-on in the Circle City, and I think a subtle discoveries like the one featured here can show precisely how cities like Indianapolis can further leverage the novel approaches that they’re currently pioneering.  Specifically, let’s explore the...
read more

Sears at Castleton Closes: How to Rethink the Space Amidst the Retail Apocalypse

Sears at Castleton Closes: How to Rethink the Space Amidst the Retail Apocalypse
We knew it was going to happen eventually.   Sears Holdings Company recently announced the latest wave of closures for its two flagship department stores—Sears and Kmart—and they did not spare metro Indy from the chopping block. This time around, the Sears is closing at Castleton Square Mall, the largest and, in most regards, the best-known mall in the region. Once Sears is gone, the chain will only have one location left in the entire metro of two million: down on the south side, at Greenwood Park Mall.   We could assert that Sears’ departure is a huge blow to Castleton, but the...
read more

Washington DC begins to swarm its darkest streets with civic art. Sound familiar?

Washington DC begins to swarm its darkest streets with civic art. Sound familiar?
On the back end of Washington DC’s Union Station, numerous passenger railways stretch to the northeast across several city blocks, by means of a lengthy, viaduct-like structure. By and large, this viaduct separates the gentrifying Near Northeast neighborhood, consisting primarily of two- and three-story rowhomes set back from the street, and the gentrifying NoMa neighborhood (“North of Massachusetts”) which is redeveloping into an array of fashionable office and apartment high-rises (probably mid-rises by most other cities’ standards), along with retail on the lower level.   Perpendicular...
read more

CityWay Phase Two Breaking Ground: the Pros and the Cons

CityWay Phase Two Breaking Ground: the Pros and the Cons
Earlier this year (it’s still 2017!), Buckingham Companies broke ground on the next phase of CityWay, an expansive development south of the train trestle on land formerly belonging to Eli Lilly and Company. The first phase (completed in 2012) features over 250 apartments, parking garages fully hidden from the primary streets, the Alexander Hotel, over 40,000 square feet for retail, and a partnership with the YMCA for a voluminous fitness center across from the Alexander—all on the south side of the tracks, primarily fronting Delaware and South streets.   This next phase has morphed...
read more

The Broad Ripple Parking Garage satisfied a need (so they say). But how well does it work?

The Broad Ripple Parking Garage satisfied a need (so they say). But how well does it work?
Considering the wonderful coverage Curt here at Urban Indy provided in the months leading up to and during the construction of the Broad Ripple Parking Garage, it’s surprising that nobody wrote a feature once it opened. But it looks like we didn’t.   So here’s a chance, now that the garage has just celebrated its fourth birthday.   People in the local blogosphere routinely rant and rave about how many development projects have depended upon taxpayer subsidies to get off the ground—either in the form of liberal application of Tax Increment Financing, reduced-interest loans, or even...
read more

« Previous Entries