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Marsh handed the baton to Kroger. Here’s a retrospective five years later.

Marsh handed the baton to Kroger. Here’s a retrospective five years later.
A hat-tip must go out to the folks at Urban Indy, which, though their (our) posts may be scant, still lives on as a conversation thread.  And it was through Urban Indy conversations that I learned about the article that prompted me to write here for the first time in many moons.  It’s hard to imagine, but it has been five years since the Indianapolis staple Marsh Supermarkets closed its remaining locations: all 44 of them.  Not a huge chain and never one of national scale, Marsh was nonetheless the most prevalent grocer in many parts of Indiana and eastern Ohio in the 1980s and 90s.   Founded...
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A ghost bike on Indy’s South Side: an outlier or a signifier of greater road safety needs?

A ghost bike on Indy’s South Side: an outlier or a signifier of greater road safety needs?
It’s not typical of me to dive right back into a subject just two months after having written about it previously, but I can’t help myself: ghost bikes are an increasingly visible feature of the urbanized landscape.  (I also guess the medium is a little different this time around, because I’m asking the question on Urban Indy, regarding an Indianapolis ghost bike.) And, as I depicted in my previous article at American Dirt, which featured featured a white-painted bike memorial in a completely uninhabited mega-park in Albuquerque, sometimes they’re in areas where one’s...
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Branding the border crossing: when one side of the boundary builds a landmark…and absorbs all the monumentality.

Branding the border crossing: when one side of the boundary builds a landmark…and absorbs all the monumentality.
The City of Indianapolis deploys the word “monument” far more than most American cities, and not without good reason.  Most metrics indicate that it has the second highest concentration of memorials, landmarks, and civic plazas (behind only our nation’s capitol), and the landmark that gives the city its well-defined absolute center—the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Monument—comprises a geometrically precise plaza called “Monument Circle”–hence the nickname “Circle City”.  Indy’s popular marathon takes the name...
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Pandemic Parking: Reclaiming the Streets for Embattled Restaurants, Through the Parklets of Al Fresco Dining

Pandemic Parking: Reclaiming the Streets for Embattled Restaurants, Through the Parklets of Al Fresco Dining
I’m revisiting this site after a long, long hiatus, not because I’m back in Indy or because I have an update on development and planning.  These days, I barely make it back more than a few days each year.  And this article will not feature Indy-based photos.  But, after all those disclaimers, let me make my case: I still diligently follow the goings-on in the Circle City, and I think a subtle discoveries like the one featured here can show precisely how cities like Indianapolis can further leverage the novel approaches that they’re currently pioneering.  Specifically,...
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Sears at Castleton Closes: How to Rethink the Space Amidst the Retail Apocalypse

Sears at Castleton Closes: How to Rethink the Space Amidst the Retail Apocalypse
We knew it was going to happen eventually.   Sears Holdings Company recently announced the latest wave of closures for its two flagship department stores—Sears and Kmart—and they did not spare metro Indy from the chopping block. This time around, the Sears is closing at Castleton Square Mall, the largest and, in most regards, the best-known mall in the region. Once Sears is gone, the chain will only have one location left in the entire metro of two million: down on the south side, at Greenwood Park Mall.   We could assert that Sears’ departure is a huge blow to Castleton,...
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